Blondie – Call Me (1980)

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There were two videos made for Call Me.

One was compiled clips and video footage in New York of Deborah Harry. The video can be found on the 1991 UK video compilation The Complete Picture: The Very Best of Deborah Harry and Blondie.

The other, which came out in 1981, was non-representational, not featuring any of the band. It depicted a New York taxi driver (who had in fact appeared in numerous other Blondie music videos) driving his Checker through Manhattan traffic. This version was part of the 1981 “Best Of Blondie” compilation video.


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Hebronix – Viral (2013)

Early this year, Daniel Blumberg announced his departure from Yuck to focus on his new project Hebronix, sending shockwaves through the media and his fanbase. The Hebronix debut LP Unreal sounds like a remarkable artist taking the shaky first steps in a completely new direction. At turns druggy and sluggish, beautiful and engaged, the record is a confounding near masterpiece. The new video for “Viral,” which we are proud to premiere, features Stacy Martin of Lars Von Trier’s upcoming Nymphomaniac, and Sonja Kinski, granddaughter of legendary actor Klaus Kinski. As you might expect, the video is just as trippy and eerily lovely as the music. [Source]




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The Jesus And Mary Chain – Just Like Honey (1985)

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xcyiy8_the-jesus-and-mary-chain-just-like_music?search_algo=2#.US97Cu6pCjs


“Just Like Honey” is a song by the Scottish alternative rock band The Jesus and Mary Chain from their 1985 debut album Psychocandy. The track was released as the third single from the record through Blanco y Negro Records in September 1985. The song was written by band members William Reid and Jim Reid. The single reached number 45 on the UK Singles Chart. The song was featured in the closing scene of the 2003 film, Lost In Translation. It was also featured in the 2008 Norwegian film, The Man Who Loved Yngve, as well as a 2011 Volkswagen advertisement campaign.


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Depeche Mode – Barrel Of A Gun (1997)

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xct03m_depeche-mode-barrel-of-a-gun_music?search_algo=2#.UQ8cFVOsiSq









“Barrel of a Gun” is Depeche Mode’s thirty-first UK single, released on February 3, 1997 (January 28 in the US), and the first single from the band’s ninth studio album Ultra. “Barrel of a Gun” came after some difficult times for the band and its members. Musician Alan Wilder left the band in 1995, and lead singer David Gahan nearly died while in the throes of heroin addiction. Martin Gore had a string of seizures, and Andrew Fletcher had some emotional problems of his own. In mid-1996, Gore tried to get Gahan and Fletcher interested in recording new Depeche Mode material by writing a few songs and seeing if anybody was interested in continuing after that. It worked, and the band were back together, except now a trio again for the first time since 1982’s A Broken Frame. “Barrel of a Gun” brings back the industrial music sound, and is one of the band’s darkest songs. Gore wasn’t sure if it was going to be a big hit, so he was reluctant to recommend this song as the first single, but when he eventually did, it turned out the rest of band, Daniel Miller, and producer Tim Simenon agreed. It reached number 4 in the UK chart in 1997, which at the time was their highest chart position jointly with “People Are People”, released in 1984. Since then, “Precious” has also reached number 4 in the UK, in 2005. The B-side is a 7+ minute instrumental called “Painkiller”, which reflects the new dirty-electronic, vaguely rock angle of the band. A condensed (2+ minute) version shows up as a hidden track on the Ultra album as “Junior Painkiller”. The music video for “Barrel of a Gun” is directed by Anton Corbijn, DM’s long-time visual collaborator. It features Gahan singing with his eyes closed, with eyeballs drawn on his eyelids to make it seem like they are open. The video was shot in Morocco.


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Alice Cohen – Cascading Keys (2012)

Over the past few years, Alice Cohen‘s music has returned to the keyboard-driven sounds of the ’80s, and her latest album, Pink Keys, is a dream-pop odyssey comprised of carefully sewn-together analog synths. It’s a record that both recalls Cocteau Twins and ‘90s Pure Moods compilations (the latter is a compliment), and conjures up a fantastical landscape that’s best described by Cohen herself as music for “cosmic discotheques, dark misty beaches, tawdry hotels.” [Source]