David Bowie as VJ

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Ray Cokes writes on Facebook:

David Bowie – the next day. After a day of deep sadness, I think it’s ok to smile a little and remember amazing things that happened whenever David crossed my path. Like this following honour when he popped in to replace me on a VJ gig at MTV Europe. A most interesting insight as well…

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David Bowie – Lazarus (2016)

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“Lazarus” off David Bowie’s upcoming album Blackstar out 8 January 2016.

David Bowie – The Stars (Are Out Tonight) (2013)

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Celebrities aren’t usually the ones doing the stalking, but David Bowie re-imagines the role famous people play in other people’s lives in the video accompanying his new single “The Stars (Are Out Tonight).” Bowie and Tilda Swinton play a nicely settled middle-aged couple whose comfortable existence is upended when a celebrity pair – Saskia De Brauw and Andrej Pejic, who’s made to look startlingly like a young Bowie – follow them home from the grocery store and take over their space, both physical and emotional. The couples’ roles slowly reverse, calling into question exactly what Swinton and Bowie’s characters mean at the market when they agree, “We have a nice life.” [Source]

David Bowie – China Girl (1983)


Acting opposite David was terrifying, because he had a long history as a performer and I was a model and waitress. And in the storyline we were meant to be intimate. The first album I’d ever bought was Ziggy Stardust and I owned all his others, so it was overawing, but he was really generous as a performer. There’s a scene where I sit up suddenly, as if woken from a dream, and David leaps on top of me, and I sat up and gave him a full Liverpool kiss in the face. “Oh my God, I’ve just killed David Bowie!” But he laughed and said, “I’ve got a hard head.” He was unfailingly polite, charming and a gentleman. For us to act as boyfriend and girlfriend, we did the obvious thing in Sydney – purely as method acting. After the shoot, I got a call: “Do you want to come to Europe with me?” I became a bit of a groupie for two weeks. I knew it was a passing phase. I was 23, we lived in different worlds, but he gave me an experience that I’ll never forget. We were whisked out of back doors of hotels, flying in private jets, David hiding from fans under a rug in the limousine. It was like being in the movies. – Geeling Ng, star in the China Girl video

[Source]



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David Bowie – Look Back In Anger (1979)




“Look Back in Anger” is a song written by David Bowie and Brian Eno for the album Lodger (1979). It concerns “a tatty ‘Angel Of Death'”, and features a guitar solo by Carlos Alomar. RCA Records was unsure if America was ready for the sexual androgyny of “Boys Keep Swinging”, the lead-off single from Lodger in most territories, and “Look Back in Anger” was issued instead. The B-side was another track from Lodger called “Repetition”, a story of domestic violence. The single failed to chart. “Look Back in Anger” has a mixed reputation among Bowie commentators. NME critics Roy Carr and Charles Shaar Murray have described it as “probably the low point” of the album, while Nicholas Pegg considers it “one of Lodger’s dramatic highlights”. Beyond the shared title, the song has nothing to do with the John Osborne play Look Back in Anger. The song has been performed on the 1983/84 “Serious Moonlight” Tour and was reworked in the mid-90s as a heavy rock song for the “Outside” and “Earthling” tours. David Mallet directed a music video for the song, featuring Bowie in an artist’s studio. The scenario was based on the conclusion of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, as a self-portrait of the protagonist grows more handsome while he himself physically decays.


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