Suede – No Tomorrow (2016)

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Suede have shared a new video for ‘No Tomorrow’, the latest track revealed from their new album ‘Night Thoughts’.

The song follows other new songs recently unveiled, ‘Outsiders’ and ‘Like Kids’. Watch its retro-leaning video below.

The LP, which will feature a full string section, was produced by the band’s long-time collaborator Ed Buller and was recorded in London and Brussels.

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Duran Duran – Save A Prayer (1982)

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The video was filmed by director Russell Mulcahy among the jungles, beaches, and temples of Sri Lanka in April, 1982. Scenes were filmed atop the ancient rock fortress of Sigiriya, among the ruins of a Buddhist temple at Polonnaruwa and the island’s southern coastline.

The shoot was a difficult but memorable experience for the band. Simon Le Bon and Roger and John Taylor went ahead to the location while Andy Taylor and Nick Rhodes were in London finishing mixes for the ‘Rio’ album and B sides. They had almost no time after that was done to change clothes before catching their flight, and Rhodes wore the same leather jacket and trousers he had been wearing against the London chill.

When they arrived in Colombo, it was very hot, and Rhodes was uncomfortable in his clothing. Taylor reassured him they would be in their hotel soon and could relax. The driver who met them in a flatbed truck informed them it would be several hours’ driving time to Kandy in the centre of the country, where the band were lodged. Along the way they were struck by the poverty they witnessed.

During the filming of the scene where the band members were riding elephants, a female elephant made a strange sound. One of the crew had recorded it, and found it funny enough to play back. It turned out to be the elephant’s mating call, which led the elephant carrying Roger Taylor to charge downhill and attempt to mount the female. “It was funny as hell, but quite hairy for a moment”, says Rhodes.

While perched on a branch over a lagoon and miming playing his guitar, an intoxicated Andy Taylor fell into the water. He accidentally imbibed some, and had to be hospitalized during the band’s subsequent Australian tour due to a tropical virus he contracted at that time. The band members all initially refused to do the scene where an elephant sprays water from its trunk onto one of them due to its homoerotic overtones; they finally settled on John Taylor since he was the band’s pinup boy. He would be teased about it for years afterwards. “I didn’t care,” he wrote in 2012. “I loved it. It is one of my most treasured memories.”

Andy Taylor recalls in his memoirs that the shooting at the temple was very tense, since the country was on the verge of civil war and the temple’s monks were impatiently waiting for their leader to arrive and address a large political gathering. The band members wore bare feet in deference to the temple’s religious importance, frequently scorching themselves on the bare rock they were standing on. During some takes, the band members yelled “Fuck you Russell!” instead of mouthing the lyrics. For one scene, Le Bon and Rhodes were dropped off from a helicopter that could not itself land on the monument.

A live version of the song was released in 1984. That night, Simon Le Bon dedicated it to Marvin Gaye, who had been fatally shot the previous day. The video was taken from Duran Duran’s Oakland, California concerts that were filmed for the Arena (An Absurd Notion).

Duran Duran are donating their proceeds from Eagles Of Death Metal’s cover of Save A Prayer to charity.


Cuushe – I Dreamt About Silence (2012)




‘I Dreamt about Silence’ from the Cuushe’s new ep “Girl you know that I am here but the dream” released on flau 2012.

http://www.flau.jp/releases/26.html

buy iTunes
http://itunes.apple.com/album/you-kno…

buy Boomkat
http://boomkat.com/downloads/559048-c…

The EP’s a collection of three new songs packaged with additional remixes by Julia Holter, Motion Sickness Of Time Travel, Teen Daze, Blackbird Blackbird, Botany, Kixnare, Federico Durand, Geskia and Slow Magic. It’s limited to three 3inch CDs or download and the artwork comes courtesy of Rachel Evans of Motion Sickness of Time Travel (Spectrum Spools).
album mastered by Miles Whittaker (Demdike Stare/Pendle Coven)

© 2012 flau records.


flau26

Depeche Mode – Barrel Of A Gun (1997)

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“Barrel of a Gun” is Depeche Mode’s thirty-first UK single, released on February 3, 1997 (January 28 in the US), and the first single from the band’s ninth studio album Ultra. “Barrel of a Gun” came after some difficult times for the band and its members. Musician Alan Wilder left the band in 1995, and lead singer David Gahan nearly died while in the throes of heroin addiction. Martin Gore had a string of seizures, and Andrew Fletcher had some emotional problems of his own. In mid-1996, Gore tried to get Gahan and Fletcher interested in recording new Depeche Mode material by writing a few songs and seeing if anybody was interested in continuing after that. It worked, and the band were back together, except now a trio again for the first time since 1982’s A Broken Frame. “Barrel of a Gun” brings back the industrial music sound, and is one of the band’s darkest songs. Gore wasn’t sure if it was going to be a big hit, so he was reluctant to recommend this song as the first single, but when he eventually did, it turned out the rest of band, Daniel Miller, and producer Tim Simenon agreed. It reached number 4 in the UK chart in 1997, which at the time was their highest chart position jointly with “People Are People”, released in 1984. Since then, “Precious” has also reached number 4 in the UK, in 2005. The B-side is a 7+ minute instrumental called “Painkiller”, which reflects the new dirty-electronic, vaguely rock angle of the band. A condensed (2+ minute) version shows up as a hidden track on the Ultra album as “Junior Painkiller”. The music video for “Barrel of a Gun” is directed by Anton Corbijn, DM’s long-time visual collaborator. It features Gahan singing with his eyes closed, with eyeballs drawn on his eyelids to make it seem like they are open. The video was shot in Morocco.


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David Bowie – Look Back In Anger (1979)




“Look Back in Anger” is a song written by David Bowie and Brian Eno for the album Lodger (1979). It concerns “a tatty ‘Angel Of Death'”, and features a guitar solo by Carlos Alomar. RCA Records was unsure if America was ready for the sexual androgyny of “Boys Keep Swinging”, the lead-off single from Lodger in most territories, and “Look Back in Anger” was issued instead. The B-side was another track from Lodger called “Repetition”, a story of domestic violence. The single failed to chart. “Look Back in Anger” has a mixed reputation among Bowie commentators. NME critics Roy Carr and Charles Shaar Murray have described it as “probably the low point” of the album, while Nicholas Pegg considers it “one of Lodger’s dramatic highlights”. Beyond the shared title, the song has nothing to do with the John Osborne play Look Back in Anger. The song has been performed on the 1983/84 “Serious Moonlight” Tour and was reworked in the mid-90s as a heavy rock song for the “Outside” and “Earthling” tours. David Mallet directed a music video for the song, featuring Bowie in an artist’s studio. The scenario was based on the conclusion of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, as a self-portrait of the protagonist grows more handsome while he himself physically decays.


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David Bowie – Boys Keep Swinging (1979)

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During the Lodger recording sessions, David Bowie had wanted to capture a garage band style for the track, and decided the best way to achieve this sound was to get the band to swap instruments. Guitarist Carlos Alomar played drums and drummer Dennis Davis played bass. “Boys Keep Swinging” has exactly the same chord sequence as the song “Fantastic Voyage” from the same album (“Fantastic Voyage” was also the B-side to the single of “Boys Keep Swinging”). Bowie’s deep voice satirised machismo, while the lyrics juxtaposed depictions of male privilege and homoeroticism (“When you’re a boy, other boys check you out”). When this was combined with David Mallet’s video, which featured a suited Bowie backed by three “female” vocalists who were revealed to be the singer in drag, RCA decided against releasing the single in the US, choosing “Look Back in Anger” instead. Bowie performed the track with a puppet body special effect on Saturday Night Live on 15 December 1979, joined by Klaus Nomi as backing singer. During the broadcast NBC censors muted the “other boys check you out” line, but failed to notice the puppet’s bouncing phallus at the close of the song. The song reached #7 in the UK, returning Bowie to the top 10 of the Singles chart for the first time since “Sound and Vision” in February 1977. It has only been performed on one of Bowie tours to date, the 1995 Outside Tour. Interviewed in 2000, Bowie said the following about the song: “I do not feel that there is anything remotely glorious about being either male or female. I was merely playing on the idea of the colonization of gender.”