Soulsavers feat. Dave Gahan – Take (2013)



Soulsavers have always had a musical element to their visuals. A production team hinging on Rich Machin and Ian Glover, almost from their inception the duo have been inundated with offers to use their music in film and television. Yet most of the time, Soulsavers turn down those requests. Returning with new album ‘The Light The Dead See’ last year, the duo sparked another flurry of interest in their music. The presence of Dave Gahan undoubtedly helped. The Depeche Mode frontman worked with Rich Machin and Ian Glover, adding his vocals to productions which were driven as much by contemporary electronics as they were by timeless Americana. One track – ‘Take’ – has inspired a film maker to get behind the camera. Working of his own volition, Bernhard Wittich shot a clip in the deserted foothills of Peru. [Source]



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Depeche Mode – Barrel Of A Gun (1997)

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xct03m_depeche-mode-barrel-of-a-gun_music?search_algo=2#.UQ8cFVOsiSq









“Barrel of a Gun” is Depeche Mode’s thirty-first UK single, released on February 3, 1997 (January 28 in the US), and the first single from the band’s ninth studio album Ultra. “Barrel of a Gun” came after some difficult times for the band and its members. Musician Alan Wilder left the band in 1995, and lead singer David Gahan nearly died while in the throes of heroin addiction. Martin Gore had a string of seizures, and Andrew Fletcher had some emotional problems of his own. In mid-1996, Gore tried to get Gahan and Fletcher interested in recording new Depeche Mode material by writing a few songs and seeing if anybody was interested in continuing after that. It worked, and the band were back together, except now a trio again for the first time since 1982’s A Broken Frame. “Barrel of a Gun” brings back the industrial music sound, and is one of the band’s darkest songs. Gore wasn’t sure if it was going to be a big hit, so he was reluctant to recommend this song as the first single, but when he eventually did, it turned out the rest of band, Daniel Miller, and producer Tim Simenon agreed. It reached number 4 in the UK chart in 1997, which at the time was their highest chart position jointly with “People Are People”, released in 1984. Since then, “Precious” has also reached number 4 in the UK, in 2005. The B-side is a 7+ minute instrumental called “Painkiller”, which reflects the new dirty-electronic, vaguely rock angle of the band. A condensed (2+ minute) version shows up as a hidden track on the Ultra album as “Junior Painkiller”. The music video for “Barrel of a Gun” is directed by Anton Corbijn, DM’s long-time visual collaborator. It features Gahan singing with his eyes closed, with eyeballs drawn on his eyelids to make it seem like they are open. The video was shot in Morocco.


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Depeche Mode – Heaven (2013)

Watch the new video on tape.tv (in GAS) here and here and on VEVO (in USA) here.


Listen up, Depeche Mode fans—and we know there’s a lot of you—at midnight (CET) tonight the Timothy Saccenti-directed video for Depeche Mode‘s latest single “Heaven” will have its premiere right here and on Electronic Beats. You may have already heard the single, the second to be taken from the highly anticipated 13th album Delta Machine, as it had its first play on American radio (and quickly made it onto the internet) earlier today. We’re expecting great things from the video, director Saccenti was responsible for creating memorable clips for the likes of Battles, Washed Out and Flying Lotus. You’ll have to check back here at midnight to see what he does for the boys from Basildon. [Source]



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Coldplay – Viva La Vida (Anton Corbijn Version) (2008)

The official music video for “Viva la Vida” was directed by Hype Williams and premiered at Coldplay’s official website on 1 August 2008. The video depicts the band performing against a blurry, warped version of Eugène Delacroix’s painting La Liberté guidant le peuple. Since its release, this video “Viva La Vida” has become one of the most viewed music videos on YouTube, with over 100,000,000 views worldwide. A second, alternate video was shot in The Hague, the Netherlands, directed by Anton Corbijn and released alongside the first. This second version is a tribute to Corbijn’s video for Depeche Mode’s “Enjoy the Silence” and portrays Chris Martin as the king from whose perspective the song is sung. During the video, he carries Delacroix’s painting. At the end, he hangs the picture up in a white stall on top of a hill. As he sings the last chorus, his band mates surface heading his way, tying in loose ends from the “Violet Hill” video.













Soulsavers – Take Me Back Home (2012)

Soulsavers debut the video for “Take Me Back Home” from their latest release, The Light the Dead See. The album, out now via Mute, features lyrics and vocals by Depeche Mode’s Dave Gahan. It is the follow-up to 2009’s critically acclaimed album Broken. Venturing out from the studio to the road, Soulsavers were invited to support Depeche Mode on the European leg of the band’s vast 2010 Tour of the Universe. Here, the seeds of The Light The Dead See were sewn. With Gahan penning lyrics for the music and recording his own vocals in New York, then Rich Machin building up the results into fully-formed and arranged epics, the international project was a case of “chemistry working””. The album was mastered at Abbey Road earlier this year. [Source]




Listen to Longest Day on the NMU here.
Listen to Presence Of God on the NMU here.
Listen to In The Morning here.